J. Fallhowe, CSCS

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HOW TO STRENGTHEN HAMSTRINGS WITH SINGLE LEG GLUTE HAM RAISE

Posted by J. Fallhowe, CSCS

May 12, 2016 7:25:05 AM

Unilateral exercises (UNI - meaning training one limb at a time) are becoming more popular in the world of strength and condition. Bilateral exercises (BLI) have had a strong foot hold in the world of strength training, but do unilateral exercises offer benefits beyond those of their bilateral buddies. Let's find out:

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SPEED TRAINING PROGRAM | ABSORBING FORCE

Posted by J. Fallhowe, CSCS

Feb 1, 2016 10:40:23 AM

The ability to make game changing plays is a characteristic that all coaches look for in an athlete. We watch elite pro athletes excel at the highest level and we draw conclusions about the physical characteristics that allow them to dominate their sport. A running backs massive and strong arms and legs must help him break through arm tackles, right?... but, there are a lot of athletes and gym goers with massive arms and legs who aren't playing on Sundays. Setting skill aside, what is it that separates an elite athlete from the average athlete? 

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Topics: Geek Speak - Improving Performance

GLUTE HAM RAISE + FRENCH CONTRAST TRAINING

Posted by J. Fallhowe, CSCS

Jan 25, 2016 11:30:00 AM

The French Contrast Training (FCM) method is a relatively new form of training that's creating a lot of buzz! Gilles Cometti is a French sports scientist who developed the FCM. The FCM combines two common and effective training methods - complex and contrast training - to improve the rate at which an athlete produces force. Let's dive into the FCM to see what sets it apart.

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Topics: Geek Speak - Improving Performance

SPRINT TRAINING | WILL LIFTING HEAVY MAKE YOU SLOW?

Posted by J. Fallhowe, CSCS

Jan 18, 2016 11:37:10 AM

There seems to be more and more buzz surrounding training loads as they relate to speed and power development. I've had young athletes tell me that they don't want to lift heavy because they're afraid it will make them slower.

Sprinters seem to be the most concerned with the impacts that weight lifting will have on their performance. I understand their concern here. If you're going to spend time in the gym, you want to make sure that you're gaining an edge, not regressing.

So the question we want to answer to is - are heavier loads better for developing speed, or should athletes focus on moving sub-maximal loads more quickly? 

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Topics: Geek Speak - Improving Performance

IMPROVE POWER WITH REBOUND BARBELL BICEP CURL

Posted by J. Fallhowe, CSCS

Dec 10, 2015 5:44:57 PM

Barbell bicep curls are a favorite choice for male beach goers - "Sun's out guns out". Bicep curls aren't seen in the strength and conditioning community as a "necessary" lift. They might sneak their way into the end of a training session to help athletes increase hypertrophy and make them look a little more intimidating on the field. There isn't; however, a strength and conditioning coach in the world that would replace Power Cleans with Barbell Curls (and rightfully so,) but what if we change the dynamics of the Barbell Curl to elicit physiologic changes that align more with athletic performance? What if we could increase the amount of power athletes are able to generate during the bicep curl? We think we can!

Rebound-Barbell-Curl-Image.png

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Topics: Geek Speak - Improving Performance

THE DREADED HAMSTRING STRAIN

Posted by J. Fallhowe, CSCS

Oct 29, 2015 11:42:07 AM

If you're not terrified of pulling a hamstring, you should be. Hamstring strains are one of the most common injuries in all of sport and can be disastrous to an athletic career. A pulled hamstring can sideline an athlete for weeks, even months, and can haunt him for his entire career.

In this post, we'll show you how to avoid a hamstring injury before it happens and how to rehabilitate a pulled hamstring and get back on the field more quickly. We'll also show you the necessary training steps to decrease the likelihood of more severe future hamstring injuries.

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Topics: Geek Speak - Improving Performance

TRAIN TO AVOID A HAMSTRING STRAIN

Posted by J. Fallhowe, CSCS

Apr 16, 2015 9:00:00 AM

I love Shark Week. Watching a 2½-ton fish breach the calm sea, forcefully impact its prey and get airborne is exhilarating and a little terrifying. Now, for the record, I’m no tough guy. Before tuning in to watch these vicious shark attacks, I make sure I’m properly wedged between two couch cushions, armed with the most ferocious four-legged land creature known to man—my forty-pound miniature golden retriever, who’s afraid of the mailman—and keep my feet firmly planted on the ground. You know, just to remind myself that I’m on land.  

For whatever reason, my Shark Week Netflix binge usually occurs a week or two before a beach vacation. Don’t ask me why this always happens. Yes, I know, the stars didn’t suddenly align and force me to watch Shark Week. I made the conscious decision to press the play button. But for those of you who watch Shark Week, you know about its ability to suck you in like a tractor beam!

So, during my ocean vacation, my mind of course jumps to that poor little sea lion shark snack. Like any real man, I think, “You’re fine; you’ll never get attacked by a shark,” and swim out into the water another 10 feet before quickly turning around and hauling ass back to the beach for a burger and a beer.

Athletes typically have the same mentality when it comes to hamstring injuries. The “that would never happen to me” mentality works until the moment time slows down, you feel your muscle tear, and you know—like that poor little sea lion—it’s game over!

 

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SEEKING ALPHA: WEIGHT TRAINING FOR ATHLETES (THE FOUNDATION)

Posted by J. Fallhowe, CSCS

Apr 2, 2015 9:48:07 AM

In today’s world, everyone lifts! Weight training is no longer an auxiliary activity for athletes, it’s a requirement. If you don’t put your time in at the gym, bigger, stronger, and faster athletes will humiliate you on the field. However, being dedicated to the weight room doesn’t necessarily guarantee success like it used to. In the “olden days,” when training was the secret weapon of a few disciplined athletes, average training yielded amazing results. Today, more and more athletes have started weight training to improve performance. The bar has been raised and average training produces well… unremarkable results. In today’s world of sports, becoming Alpha requires more.

So, is it possible to squeeze more out of your training, become a truly dominant player and achieve super-human like results?

The short answer is yes, and your road to success starts with smarter training!

We’re going to show you how to intelligently structure your training routines so that you maximize your training results. While your competition is knocking out 5 x 5 routines, you’re body will be going through a ferocious beast-like transformation that will have coaches, players and scouts in awe of your super-human like abilities.

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THE 10 BEST HAMSTRING EXERCISES

Posted by J. Fallhowe, CSCS

Jan 11, 2015 1:56:00 PM

Hamstrings are arguably the most important muscle group for athletes to focus on if they want to dramatically improve performance.  Unfortunately, they’re often the most neglected.  This is mainly because athletes, crossfitters and weightlifters don't understand the important role they play in athletic performance.  Most think that the hamstrings serve one purpose: to facilitate knee flexion (think of kicking up to your butt when you run). The hamstrings, however, serve a much more important function: hip extension.  Powerful hip extension is paramount for sprinting, jumping, Olympic weightlifting, and overall explosiveness during athletic movements and activities.  

In this post, we'll show you the 10 exercises to include in your training routine to help improve your hamstring strength quickly! 

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REPLACE HAMSTRING STRETCHES WITH ECCENTRIC GHR TO IMPROVE FLEXIBILITY

Posted by J. Fallhowe, CSCS

Jan 8, 2015 10:50:00 AM

According to research in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, athletes are more likely to be sidelined by a hamstring injury than any other muscle related injury.  A pulled hamstring or hamstring strain is an injury to one or more of the muscles at the back of the thigh.  The good news is that most pulled hamstrings don't require surgery and heal on their own.  Unfortunately, a pulled hamstring, depending on its severity, can put an athlete out of action for a number of weeks.

Common sense would tell you that static stretching should help prevent hamstring injuries; most athletes turn to static stretching to "loosen" the muscles and improve flexibility.  Recent research, however, suggests that flexibility can be improved just as much by included eccentric exercises in your training with the added benefit that eccentric exercises will make you incredibly strong!

In this post, we'll show you three hamstring exercises to include in your training to help you build strength, increase flexibility and prevent season-ending injuries.

 

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